Witness History !! {Video}The Solar Eclipse 2017: What To Expect & What You Need To Know

Published On August 21, 2017 | By admin | Local & Worldwide News

A total solar eclipse will cross the United States from coast to coast on Monday, starting just after 10 a.m. local time in Oregon and ending just before 3 p.m. in South Carolina.

• The last time an eclipse traveled across the entire country was in 1918.

• Veteran eclipse chasers say you should prepare to feel changed forever if this is your first total eclipse. We made a guide on how to watch the eclipse safely, and another if you’re stuck indoors. We’re collecting and sharing your photos from the eclipse here.

• Weather forecasts suggested that states like Oregon, Idaho and Wyoming would have favorable skies, while Nebraska and South Carolina faced the prospect of clouds and storms. Heavy traffic manifested in some locations on Monday.

• Scientists are hoping their studies of this eclipse will lead to important discoveries about the sun’s mysterious corona, which burns more than a million degrees hotter than the sun’s surface.

Here’s where the eclipse will go, and when.

The moon will begin to get in the sun’s way over the Pacific Ocean on Monday morning. This will create a zone that scientists call totality — the line where the moon completely blocks the sun, plunging the sea and then a strip of land across the continental United States into a darkness that people and other living things can mistake for premature evening.

Around 1:15 p.m. Eastern time, the total solar eclipse will first reach Oregon’s coast. Then it will race for the next 90 or so minutes over 13 more states: Idaho, Montana (barely), Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa (hardly), Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and finally South Carolina.

At about 2:49 p.m. Eastern time in South Carolina, some lucky souls in the Palmetto State’s marshes could be the last on American soil to experience the total eclipse. Just after 4 p.m. Eastern, the partial eclipse will end and all of America will again be under the full August sun.

If you don’t live in one of these states, don’t despair: Every American state will experience a partial solar eclipse (although it won’t darken the sky like a total eclipse). In Honolulu, the sun will be about 20 percent covered. In Brownsville, Texas, you’ll see something like a half sun. Here in New York when the maximum eclipse occurs around 2:44 p.m. Eastern, the sun will be just over 70 percent obscured (and here are tips for taking in New York City’s partial eclipse).

But don’t look directly at the partially eclipsed sun.

We can’t emphasize enough that you need special glasses before looking up at the eclipse, lest you risk permanent damage to your eyes. Your sunglasses won’t do the job. Wear your special glasses for viewing during the partial eclipse phases.

But even those who planned ahead need to make sure their eyewear will offer sufficient protection.

There are reports across the United States of glasses that were handed out but later recalled after vendors questioned the authenticity of their safety certification. Amazon was among the companies to recall some glasses.

If you’re in the line of totality, you can remove your glasses once the sun is completely blocked and admire the enigmatic disc of the moon and the threads of corona that appear at its edges. Savor these minutes. Put your glasses back on as soon as the moon moves on and the sun begins to reappear.

Maybe you didn’t get eclipse glasses in time — they’re sold out at a lot of places — or maybe you got some that were fraudulent and you had to throw them away. You still have options for eclipse viewing. You can make a pinhole projector with two paper plates


Scientists are very excited about this eclipse.

Total solar eclipses are marvelous opportunities to study Earth’s intimate relationship with the sun.

Eclipses happen about once every 18 months. But because Earth’s surface is covered mostly by water, they tend to occur over remote locations that are difficult for scientists to reach with advanced equipment for observation. For most American scientists it is perhaps the most accessible total solar eclipse since the last one to touch the lower 48 states in 1979. And in those 38 years, their equipment and ability to study the phenomena have greatly improved.

Scientists have long been puzzled by the sun’s corona, the thin plasma veil that encases the star, because it burns more than a million degrees hotter than the sun’s surface. Only during totality is the corona visible from Earth.

That’s when astronomers and citizen scientists across the total eclipse’s 3,000-mile long path will focus their attention on the white, wispy crown. They will observe it with telescopes, some as a part of the Citizen CATE project which aims to film totality for 90 minutes across the country.

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